Seductive Venice

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Feb 26, 2022

Venice seduces us in so many ways–with her watery, curving reflections; her hidden corners shot through with light; her disguises, her artistic creations inspired by centuries of tradition.

Casanova once walked La Serenissima’s calle and drifted down her canals, on the way to a tryst or an adventure. Let these images take you back into your own Venetian memories, your dreams and your desires. You might spy glittering glass beads through a window or sumptuous Fortuny fabrics sailing overhead. You might peer through doorways into other vistas. You might repose within the cool marble walls of a bright white church or duck your head passing beneath an arching bridge.

Venice beckons in the shape of gondoliers, maskers, artists, violinists, welcoming you to explore her secret streets and mirrored canals. Play in the shadows and in the light as it bounces off stone and water. Then meet up with your friends for an Aperol Spritz or a cool raboso. As the light closes out the day, toast to love, to beauty, to history, to Venice, grateful that we get to enjoy her charms.

(Grazie mille to Kathleen Gonzalez, author of Seductive Venice: In Casanova’s Footsteps and other books celebrating and revealing Venice’s history and my dear friend Frank Yantorno for several of the dazzling evening photos.)

Street Food & Street Art in Naples

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Feb 5, 2022

In the 20th century, cultural icons such as Hemingway, Pablo Neruda and Andy Warhol were seduced by this cinematic city by the sea. Today, trendsetting young artists and writers along with top culinary innovators are drawn to the city’s many sensory appeals. Enjoy this a passeggiata through Naples’ historic center—a fascinating labyrinth of narrow streets and a visual feast of exuberant street art and mouth-watering Neapolitan street foods.

For all you foodies—Naples is home to roughly 3,000 pizza makers, or pizzaiuoli. Beyond topping and crust variations, pizza can be experienced in other forms like a portable folded pizza “walletknown as pizza a portafoglia, or even a super-indulgent fried pizza!  And there’s frittatina di pasta …. yes, deep-fried pasta! Crunchy on the outside, soft on the inside medallions of pasta mixed with béchamel sauce, peas and other tasty fillings. And not to be missed is a portable cone-shaped cuoppo filled with mouth-watering fried calamari, small anchovies and sardines. You’ll also find cuoppi filled with other fried goodies. The key is that the fried items are so light, dry and delectable that the paper cone doesn’t become greasy in your hand. Naples serves up some of the best caffe in all of Italy and its sfogliatella is one of the sweetest street foods ever!

Street art created by local and international artists is everywhere. Look for the landmark mural of a Madonna with a gun instead of a halo above her head is located in Piazza dei Girolamini. The arresting image is by Banksy—a pseudonymous England-based artist and the world’s most famous street artist. You will also find Sofia Loren, born not far from Naples and many and varied depictions of San Gennaro, the city’s Patron and that of the notorious Baroque painter Caravaggio who spent some of the last years of his life in Naples.

Besides its vibrant street life, Naples offers many marvelous cultural attractions. You’ll also discover elegant caffes and restaurants, boutique hotels, independent design ateliers, art galleries and bookshops—ideal for some retail therapy.

Swept Away in Sardinia

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Jan 15, 2022

Sardinia beckons with its crystalline blue waters and sun-soaked beaches, dramatic rugged landscapes, eclectic cuisine, and gentle, gracious people.  It’s also a mysterious island filled with much to discover reflecting its unique history and geography.

Though the island is now part of Italy, Sardinia produced a culture distinctly its own over the last two millennia. The ancient Nuragic people were its first inhabitants, as far back as 1500 to 460 B.C., and their presence can still be felt in the 7,000 conical “nuraghe” megaliths they left behind.

And the island’s relative isolation has resulted in the development of native vegetation as well as animal species, such as the white donkey of the Asinara.

For those seeking distinctive gastronomic experiences, Sardinian food and wine offer culinary treasures galore. With over 1,100 miles of coastline and an abundant mountain interior, Sardinia features marvelous seafood (what would you expect, given its name!), rustic specialties like roasted pig, and unique breads and pasta preparations, including fregola – a cross between grain and pasta with a nutty flavor and texture all its own.

Moreover, Sardinia is known as one of the five locales in the world with the highest number of centenarians – those living 100 years or more. Why?  In truth, there is no definite answer to this question. Some scientists believe that the secret lies in distinctive local DNA; for others, the answer relates to a lifestyle of pastoral simplicity along with Sardinia’s cuisine which epitomizes the healthful Mediterranean diet.

Another thing I especially love are the hundreds of murals, virtual open-air museums, that express Sardinia’s unique cultural identity, customs and traditions, daily life and even political discourse.

Renowned for their poignancy and immediacy, the murals found in the town of Orgosolo, painted in the 60’s, reflect the artistic verve of a group of feuding anarchists.

I hope this whets your appetite for Sardinia as you dream of and begin to plan a post-Omicron sojourn exploring the many cultural and natural glories of the Boot.